1973 Ferrari 365 GT/4 2+2

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Details

The late 1960’s and early 1970’s were a fabulous time for Ferrari. Its flagship 365 GTB/4 Daytona was a resounding success and Enzo’s ‘big risk’ the Dino 246 was also selling very well. At that time Ferrari wanted to continue with his tradition of producing high performance ‘Grand Touring’ cars with a 2+2 configuration and the 365 GTC/4, which was a successor to the 365 GT 2+2 and 365 GTC, filled that niche. The early 1970′s were a time of innovation and Ferrari, Lamborghini, Maserati et al continued to introduce new models in an endeavour to trump the other. The 365 GTC/4 was only in production in 1971 & 1972 and its successor the 365 GT/4 2+2 was first shown in October 1972 at the Paris Motor Show. This car, designed and built by Pininfarina, featured unique styling and whilst the sharp angular lines were ‘very new’ for Ferrari is did share the characteristic design feature of a swage line dividing the body into an upper and a lower half with the 365 GTB/4 Daytona. Unlike the GTC/4 the GT/4 2+2 could seat four people in relative comfort. Mechanically the 365 GT/4 2+2 was almost identical to the 365 GTC/4 and its 4390 cc quad cam V12 engine with six Weber 38DCOE side draught carburettors put out an impressive 320 bhp was capable of propelling the car from 0-60 mph (0-100 km/hr) in a healthy 6.4 seconds and a top speed in excess of 150 mph (250 km/hr).

In period the car was well regarded though the oil crisis of the 1970′s made the car somewhat difficult to sell and only 524 examples were built from 1973 to 1976.

This stunning 1973 Ferrari 365 GT/4 2+2 is now available at Oldtimer Australia.

This UK delivered factory right hand drive example was delivered new to a Mr AJ Gooding from Glamorgan, Wales in the UK. The car was initially registered as TPK 51M and delivered in late 1973. Mr Gooding only had the car a short time and it was then acquired by its second (Australian) owner Mr J Inward. One of Australia’s most respected Ferrari mechanics, John Allan, recalls the car with Mr Inward when near new and it is believed to have been imported to Melbourne in 1974.

By early 1984/5 it was in the ownership of a well know Ferrari identity in Sydney, who recalls attending a Ferrari Rally in the car at that time. The car passed to a former club racer in 1985 and he used the car sparingly. In 2011 Cavallino Motorsport in Sydney rebuilt the heads (installing new valves & seats), detailed the engine bay, replaced the load leveller suspension, fitted new Michelin XWX tyres and attended to many other tasks. During this period receipts show some circa $30,000 spent on the car.

Since then it has had little use until the current owner acquired the car in June 2014. At that time it was still wearing original but tired hyperion blue paint work with very good tan leather trim & blue carpet. According to factory records the car was hyperion blue with a blue interior new. The current owner has recently taken the car back to bare metal and its original colour, under the blue, was avorio (ivory). According to the historians Ferrari painted a number of cars in this colour in period and then repainted them to order for customers as required. Maybe that’s what happened here?  The car has new black carpets in the interior & boot and HVL correct appearance mouse hair for dash, console and rear parcel shelf. The car looks absolutely stunning in this unique colour that really suits the car.

Additionally the current owner had the following work done: a reconditioned exhaust system was fitted, the Becker radio restored, wheels refinished, new screens fitted, new Koni shocks, service and regas air con.

Everything works as it should and the engine is strong and rorty with no smoke. In recent times circa $60,000 had been spent on the car.

This has to be the last of the relatively affordable classic front engined V12 Ferraris.

The car is ‘matching numbers’ and it has books (the original operating manual and a proper reproduction pouch) & tools (the correct tool box, jack & tool and hammer).

The odometer is circa 36,716 miles which we believe is genuine.


Specification

  • Ferrari 365 GT/4 2+2
  • 1973
  • Coupe
  • Manual
  • 36716 miles
  • 4390 cc

SOLD

Register interest if a similar car becomes available