1933 Rolls Royce Phantom II Landaulette

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Details

The legend that was to become Rolls Royce was founded in May 1904 when a deal was struck between Frederick Henry Royce and Charles Stewart Rolls. Shortly after the first Rolls Royce motor car, the Rolls-Royce 10 hp, was unveiled at the Paris Motor Show in December 1904. It was agreed that Rolls Royce would initially manufacture four different models being a two cylinder 10hp model, a three cylinder 15hp model, a four cylinder 20hp model and a six cylinder 20hp model. It was immediately apparent that to manufacture their cars Rolls Royce would require a larger factory and the decision was made to establish their headquarters and manufacturing facility on the outskirts of Derby in the east midlands of England.

On the 15th March 1906 the company Rolls Royce Limited was formed and during this year Royce had been developing an improved six-cylinder model with more power than the 30hp. Initially designated the 40/50hp, this was the company’s first all-new model that was also to become known as the Silver Ghost.

Like all car manufactures Rolls Royce was impacted by the first world war, however, post war the company made a strategic decision to manufacture a cheaper smaller car, enter the Rolls Royce 20hp. This model was a success and produced alongside the Silver Ghost and its successor the Phantom ensuring the Rolls Royce motor car company would survive and prosper.

In 1931 Rolls Royce acquired the Bentley motor car company.

The Phantom II succeeded the Phantom I (or new Phantom) in 1929. This new model was a more refined motor vehicle that was built on a brand new chassis. It featured an improved version of the 40/50hp 7.7 litre engine from the Phantom I as well as a number of other mechanical enhancements. From 1932 synchromesh was added to third and fourth gears and from 1935 on second gear also.

Only the chassis and mechanical parts were made by Rolls-Royce. The body was made and fitted by a coachbuilder selected by the owner. Some of the most famous coachbuilders who produced bodies for Rolls Royce cars are Park Ward, Thrupp & Maberley, Mulliner, Henley and Hooper.

Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for a sale a fabulous matching numbers 1933 Rolls Royce Phantom II Landaulette bodied by Hooper.

The car is chassis 148MY with engine GF25.

148MY was sold new into England and its first owner was a Mrs Fredk. Thompson from Tunbridge Wells in Kent who ordered the car new with a second spare wheel / tyre, heating in the back and various other options. The documentation provided by Rolls Royce notes the second owner as Mr Chas Hill from North Carolina in the USA from February 1966. According to the Rolls Royce Enthusiasts Club in the USA Hill owned the car until at least 1972 and most likely 1984 when 148MY’s next owner is noted as Keith C Beers from Texas, USA. The car is understood to have been kept in a museum (presumably in Beers’ ownership) before being acquired and imported into Australia by Perth based collector Maurice Brockwell in circa 1989. The car was kept as part of Brockwell’s substantial collection before being on sold to a Rolls Royce collector in Melbourne, Victoria in 1995. He owned the car for a few years and on sold it to another Rolls Royce enthusiast based in Brisbane, Queensland. Over a three or four year period he fully restored the car. The project was managed by vintage car specialist Joe Wilson. The car remained in his ownership for twenty years before being acquired by Oldtimer Australia.

This car is a previous Concours winner and although an older restoration it still presents really well today. The car certainly has a ‘presence’ about it! The paint is very good though there is the odd scratch and stone chip evident. There is a light scrape on the passenger front door and also a scrape on the drivers door where it has contacted against the mirror. The panel gaps are all excellent and the doors open and close perfectly . . . just as a classic Rolls Royce should. All of the bright work and trim are also in very good condition. The interior is ‘like new’ and importantly everything looks to be correct.

The car starts easily and soon settles into a smooth idle. On the road the car drives really well and performs as it should.

On file there are copies of the original build sheets which confirm the car is ‘matching numbers’. There is also an Owners handbook and parts catalogue that will accompany the car. There is also a significant tool kit under the front seat.

A unique opportunity.

 

 


Specification

  • -
  • Rolls Royce Phantom II Landaulette
  • 1933
  • Landaulette
  • Manual
  • 98688 miles
  • 7668 cc

SOLD

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